Formula 707 Simplifies their Product Line!

We are really excited here at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supply that Formula 707 has made a huge effort to make their product easier to administer to horses! I am sure barn owners and boarders alike can attest to the challenges of setting up their supplement routine for their horses. Formula 707 has introduced Fresh Packs! Their supplements are now available in pre-packaged servings to make traveling to events easier and making sure that feeding routines are simplified. What else makes these Fresh Packs great, you ask? Well, for one- these fresh packs insure just that, your supplement stays fresh! We all know how it is when you get half-way through a supplement and it’s hardened or changed consistency. It’s money right out the window. Another great aspect of this product is you know that you are giving the right amount needed for your horse, and they are extremely convenient to use. Also, they are affordable!

For me, I find the Fresh Packs extremely desirable.  First reason being, I know that my horse is getting the correct serving based on these pre-measured packets. Secondly, I know that when I head to shows, I don’t have have to find containers to ration the servings out or drag the whole tub with me. I can also imagine for those that are responsible for feeding horses at a large barn will enjoy the amount time that is reduced by using these new Fresh Packs!

Lets get into the actual products by Formula 707 that are available at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supply!

First up, and probably the most important in  most minds is Ulzerless!

Ulzerless currently retails at $44.96 for a 28 day supply, and for orders over $70.00, this item ships free! This supplement helps horses digest and reduce the acidic erosion of the stomach lining. A supplement like Ulzerless is great for horses that are traveling, showing, or in training. We just had a great Facebook Live Event with Dr. Keckler about EGUS! Check out the video below if you would like more information on ulcers in horses!

Formula 707 also has Fresh Packs in their Calming supplement.

Their calming supplement currently retails at $35.96 for a 28 day supply and ships free on orders over $70.00. This product is great for horses with anxiety, exhibit muscle tremors, need help focusing, and utilizes Thiamine and Magnesium oxide to offset these incidences. For those of us with spirited horses that are easily distracted and get worried in new situations, this is a great product to consider! Especially because it is so easy to take with you!

Formula 707 also makes a Hoof Health Supplement. This supplement is a 56 day supply for currently only $37.96. This product also ships free on orders over $70.00. This product is packed with vitamins & minerals, amino acids, and the protein needed to insure you are growing a nice hoof on your horse. For those that have brittle and cracked hooves, this is great product to give a shot!

For the affordability, you can’t go wrong with this supplement! It is definitely worth a try, and available here. 

Saving the best for last is our biggest seller for the Formula 707 line, Daily Essentials. Daily Essentials is an alfalfa based pellet that works to improve the overall condition and performance of your horse. This is a tried and true product that is a staple in a lot race barns. Filled with all of the vitamins and minerals horses needs, you can’t help but see their bodies reflect their improved soundness and health. Daily Essentials is currently available for $33.96 for a 56 day supply! And qualifying for free shipping on orders over $70.00, you just can’t beat it!

I hope you are able to enjoy the new Fresh Packs as much as I will! I am positive barn managers everywhere will be appreciative of the convenience the Fresh Packs provide for a boarding or training facility!

Please note, prices are subject to change*

Bitless Training with Justin Dunn!

We had an amazing opportunity to team up with Weaver Leather and Justin Dunn with Justin Dun Mustang Horsemanship to host a few seminars at our 3rd Annual Anniversary Event at our store located in Streetsboro, Ohio. We were really excited to have Justin Dunn join us to talk to us about his Bitless Bridle that he partnered with  Weaver Leather to make. Justin Dunn gained his notoriety through the Extreme Mustang Makeover.

We got to know Justin a little bit more and how he got his start with Bitless training and mustangs. We also had the opportunity to host a contest for a local Big Dee’s fan to win a private one hour session with Justin Dunn!

The winner of the contest was Sarah and her recently rescued mustang mare Mae, whom she was fostering. Sarah had been experiencing difficulty gaining Mae’s trust and this couldn’t be more up Justin’s alley! Here are some pictures from when we first arrived to meet Sarah and Mae:

After we spent some time with her outside we brought her in to work with her some more and eventually hand the lead back to Sarah so Justin could work with her some. Here is the video of their private lesson!

Once he worked with Sarah and Mae on getting their communication better, Justin made his way back to Big Dee’s. Justin was scheduled for 2 seminars and had a packed house! He answered questions from the audience and discussed his Bitless Bridle some more! Below are the 2 seminars he did for us. It was a pleasure having Justin Dunn and Weaver Leather here with us! Hope you enjoy learning about bitless training!

Big Dee’s April 2017 $1000 Prize Pack Giveaway!

Big Dee's Tack and Vet - $1000 Giveaway

Everyone loves a great giveaway! This one includes all kinds of goodies for you and your horse!

The winner will receive the following ..

The winner will be drawn on May 1st and notified by email. No purchase necessary.

Good Luck!!

Click here to enter 

Horse Feed Room Storage and Organization

Feed Room Storage and Organization

Feed Scoop | Big Dee's
Horse Feed Storage and Feed Room Organization

The efficiency of feeding time is reliant on how well organized and accessible your grain and supplements are stored. From a small back-yard barn to the largest boarding facilities the ultimate goal should be the same: ease of use, maintaining feed quality, accuracy of feeding and minimizing unnecessary footsteps. I hope to offer some great ideas on how to handle feed room storage and feed room organization.

Having a safe and secure feed storage area will aid in ensuring the overall health and well-being of your horse. While we never wish for a horse to get loose, it is always a possibility and as such all grain should be kept in an area off-limits to horses. If your facility does not have a separate stall or room that can be secured from the threat of a loose horse you will need to source feed storage containers that horses are unable to break into. Do not be fooled by that reassuring click of a trash can, horses can get into them successfully and the results of a horse overeating can be devastating.

Feed Storage

Grain stored in bags can be susceptible moisture and rodent damage and could easily be damaged by a loose horse.  Grain maintains it freshness best in cool, dry conditions. An ideal feed storage container should offer a tight seal to keep the freshness of the feed in while keeping pests, contaminants and moisture out. Continue reading Horse Feed Room Storage and Organization

Practical Bitting Seminar

Practical Bitting Seminar

horse bits

Wondering about your choice of bits for your horse or is bitting a mystery to you?

Does your horse have telltale signs it might be the wrong choice?

Do you know how to determine the correct bit size for your horse?

Have you run out of friend’s bits to try?

We can help with all of this & more!

Join bitting experts Vivian Schmidt & Lisa Gorretta at our Herm Sprenger practical bitting seminar on Sunday April 23rd at Sweetwater Equestrian Center – 6490 Peck Rd. Ravenna, OH 44266. This seminar is FREE! Schedule a time to bring your horse to discuss issues & find the correct fit!

Time slots for horses available from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm.

Space is limited – call to reserve your spot today! 1-800-321-2142

No horse is necessary to attend the seminar – attendees are welcomed & encouraged!

You can also attend Vivian’s seminar during the Anniversary Sale Event at Big Dee’s on Saturday April 22nd at 1:00 pm!


Practical Bitting Seminar

Safe Spring Pasture Practices

Introducing a Horse to Spring Pasture

Eventually Spring will come.  Despite the massive snowfall much of Northeast Ohio received this past week, Spring is on its way.  Many of us have cloistered our horses in their stalls for much of the winter.  When turned out in the pasture, they have been dependent on round bales. Some sifted through the snow for any scraps of dormant grass they could find.  All of them have been dependent upon hay for their forage needs, but soon we will have lush green pastures once again.  While this is a fantastic occurrence, early spring grass presents its own challenges for us horse owners.

First, to preserve the integrity of our pastures, we need to let our grass grow and develop healthy root systems.  To ensure healthy pastures that will last all summer and into the fall, it may be necessary to use a sacrifice area or paddock for a few weeks.  According to an article found on the Penn State University Extension website – grass should be allowed to grow to 4-6 inches before introducing horses to pasture.

Diet Changes

Secondly, abrupt changes in a horse’s diet can lead to some serious problems.  One common issue that can be avoided is founder.  Horses, and especially ponies, can be prone to founder if they are turned out to pasture for an excessive length of time without an acclimation period.  According to Christine Skelly of the Department of Animal Sciences at Michigan State University, grazing time should be restricted to roughly 20 minutes the first day. Increasing in 5 minute intervals thereafter until the horse has adjusted its diet to the fresh pasture grass.  She lists other recommendations, including feeding horses hay prior to turn out.  This will hopefully cut down on the amount of pasture grass they are eating initially.

Spring Pasture | Big Dee's

Colic

Another issue that I have some personal experience with is colic.  While most horses will be trouble free when properly introduced to spring pastures, there are those who have a tendency to over indulge.  One of my horses, Sydney, will eat himself right into an impaction if left unchecked.  Other horses may have this same tendency. Or may simply be prone to obesity when left to their own designs in the pasture.

A solution to both of those issues is to use a grazing muzzle.  While your horse may hate you for the first week or so, know that you are taking a responsible step that your horse is either unable or unwilling to take for itself – limiting consumption.  After a near two week stay at a local veterinary clinic, Sydney has had to wear a grazing muzzle for the past four years.  He is still able to graze, just not at the rate he would prefer.  We offer several styles and brands of grazing muzzles at Big Dee’s.  Some clip directly to your horse’s halter, and others are a muzzle and halter combination.  I have been using the Best Friend Equine Grazing Muzzle Deluxe on Sydney, and have been very satisfied with it.

Sugar Content

Also be aware of is that the sugar levels in grass can wreak havoc on metabolic horses.  Early spring pasture grass is higher in sugar (fructan) content than either summer or fall pasture grass.  Again, grazing muzzles can be a very good solution depending on your horse’s unique requirements.  I would recommend consulting with your veterinarian if you have a metabolic horse.  As a general rule, the sugar content in grass will be highest during the afternoon hours. It builds during the day and starts to recede in the evening hours.  Night time or early morning turnout times generally will work better for metabolic horses.

Hopefully we can all be worrying about properly introducing our horses to beautiful, lush, green spring pastures in the very near future.  For the time being however, I believe I have a driveway to plow.

Multi-Vitamins for Horses

Multi-Vitamin Supplements

Deciding on an adequate nutrition program for one’s horse can, at times, be a frustrating endeavor.  There are so many differences, from types of feed to the amount one needs to feed to ensure all of your horse’s nutritional needs are being met.  Combine that with differences in the quality of hay from field to field.  First to second cut, and nutrient loss over time – one can really struggle to provide the best possible diet for one’s horse.  Feeding a general multi-vitamin can help ensure that your horse is getting the vitamins and minerals it needs.

Multi-vitamins are going to include a wide range of vitamins including vitamin A, D, E, and the B-complex vitamins.  Most horses can meet their requirements of vitamin A simply by grazing.  However, especially here in northeast Ohio, horses are unable to graze year round.  As we switch from relying on pasture for our horses forage requirements to relying on hay, we need to consider the impact storage has on vitamin content.

What Should You Look For

Hay, no matter what quality, will lose vitamins, especially vitamin A over time.  The hay we are feeding in February, March, and April is of significantly lower quality than the same hay that was fed last September or October. Because vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin, horses are capable of storing it for a certain amount of time. This can somewhat offset the content lost in hay over time. However, towards the end of winter it may be a good idea to look for alternative sources for vitamin A.

Vitamin D is readily available, especially during summer months, as horses can obtain all they need from the sun.  Again though, not all of our horses are turned out all day during the winter months.  Some show horses are kept stalled and turned out either for short amounts of time, or in indoor arenas only.  For these horses, vitamin D supplementation is important as well.

Horses in strenuous work during the winter months have and horses suffering from muscular system disorders need extra help.  Supplemental vitamin E and the mineral selenium can be very valuable and help prevent certain disorders.

The B-complex vitamins are water soluble, and some are produced in sufficient quantities by a horse’s digestive system.  Depending on the quality of grain and hay being fed, you may wish to supplement B vitamins as well.  For instance, Biotin, a B vitamin, has been shown to increase the health of the hoof. Biotin is a common ingredient in most hoof supplements.  By using a multi-vitamin approach to supplementing your horse’s diet, you may be able to provide enough Biotin to eliminate that hoof supplement.

Big Dee's | Horse Supplements | Multi-Viitamins

Extra Ingredients For Multi-Vitamins

Other ingredients to look for in multi-vitamins are minerals, amino acids, and pre- and pro-biotics.  When looking at mineral levels, one thing to pay attention to is the calcium to phosphorous ratio (it should be somewhere close to 1.5 : 1).  Look to see if your supplement is supplying chelated minerals or inorganic minerals.  Chelated minerals are minerals chemically combined with at least one amino acid, and are thought to be more bioavailable than inorganic, or raw minerals.  Choosing a supplement with a pre- and pro-biotic to help your horse’s efficiency of digestion is always a good idea.

Accel and Accel Lifetime by Vita-Flex are two excellent choices for a general vitamin and mineral supplement.  They provide a comprehensive range of vitamins, minerals, amino acids, and several strains of pre- and pro-biotics.  Vita-Plus, a Farnam product, is another good one, as is Dac’s Orange Superior.  I feed Progressive Nutrition’s Pro Add Ultimate, and have had excellent results in topline conditioning, coat bloom, and hoof health.  This particular supplement, similar to Purina’s Super Sport, is a high protein, amino acid supplement with added vitamins and minerals.

Take a close look at the numerous multi-purpose vitamin and mineral supplements we have to offer.  I am sure you will be able to find one that fits the needs of your horse and budget.  You can bridge the gap between your feeding program and your horse’s nutritional requirements.

Mud Fever getting you down?


We’ve all been there when our seemingly healthy horse comes in from the pasture or out of their stall one morning with blown up legs. You immediately take a gander and feel around with your hands searching for heat or a cut, only to find a colony of scabs. The entire leg may or may not look like a balloon, but your heart feels like it’s about to burst. Though this is a common nuisance for horse owners, mud fever can be a pain to deal with and can lead to chronic skin issues.

So what is mud fever? Mud fever is a common name for pastern dermatitis. It is an infection caused by a group of bacteria that flourish in wet and muddy conditions. Mud fever is a loose term for a whole slew of skin reactions affecting the lower extremities of your horse. Mud fever can also be referred to as “greasy heels” or “cracked heels”, as the heels are usually the origin of the infection.

The mud fever causing bacterial organisms do just fine living on healthy equine skin causing little to no harm on its own. However, once a cut, scrape, or wound is present, the door has been opened for the bacterial organisms to climb their way into the layers of the skin. Once the skin has been injured or breeched by being too wet, a bite, or injury, the bacteria then multiple in the damp and warm skin causing an infection.

Images of Mud Fever on the heels

Symptoms of Mud Fever in Horses Mud Fever also know as pastern dermatitis Irritation caused by Equine Mud Fever Mud Fever can spread quickly on the horses pastern and lower limbs

Mud fever can quickly spread to other areas of the lower leg and become a more severe infection.

Causes

There are conditions that predispose horses to mud fever. Even certain soil types can make horses prone to mud fever. Some of other contributing factors are:

  • White limbs or white patches (may be due to photosensitivity)
  • Prolonged exposure to damp & muddy paddocks
  • Soiled bedding
  • Sweat that has not been properly removed
  • Not thoroughly drying the limbs when excessive washing is a constant occurance
  • Feathered legs- mostly because they tend to be washed more than those without feathers
  • Injury resulting from rubs, bites, chaffing, excessive and rough grooming
  • Weak immune system compromising the integrity of the skin which is more than likely secondary to another underlying condition
  • Mites
  • Fungal infections

Signs

There are many tell tale signs of mud fever as well, as it can come in many forms:

  • Scabs beneath matted areas of hair
  • Once the hair and scab falls off, there are circular ulcerated lesions of moist and red skin
  • Discharges in a thick, creamy consistency, are usually white, yellow, or green color and found between the skin and scab
  • The scab will have a concave shape, with hair follicles protruding. Mud fever and rain rot/scald are the same thing just on different parts of the body.
  • Hair loss
  • Severe causes have been known to show the skin splitting in the back, thus the term cracked heels
  • Heat and swelling are typically present and can generate up to the knee or hock
  • In the most severe cases, lameness, loss of appetite, and depression are present

Treatment

The best preventative for mud fever is to keep the legs as dry as possible for as long as possible when there are wet and muddy conditions. Once mud fever has set in there are a few topical treatments that can be applied to help heal your horses skin. Take a look below for a few of our favorites:

Keratex Mud Shield Powder

Keratex Mud Shield Powder

This product helps guard against mud and water while disinfecting the skin. What is great about this product and makes it standout is that it is a powder. So rather than continually keeping the skin damp with promotes bacterial growth, this is a dry application that can be used as after it the legs have been shampooed and dried, or as a preventative on the way out to pasture.

Absorbine Fungasol

Absorbine Fungasol

This is a great product line that includes a shampoo, spray, and ointment. Gently scrub the entire leg with the Fungasol shampoo and let it sit for about 7-10 minutes, so that it can kill all the bad bacteria. Then thoroughly dry the legs off, top with the Fungasol spray and apply the ointment where there are deep fissures.

Muck Itch Spray

Muck Itch Spray for Horses

This is a relatively newer product on the market and the feedback has been great! It specifically treats mud fever and provides a protective barrier to the skin. What is really cool with this product is the use of organic essential oils.  This helps calm the skin and allow new hair growth to begin.

Micro-Tek Medicated Shampoo and Spray

Micro Tek Equine Spray - Soothes on Contact Micro Tek Equine Shampoo - Soothes on Contact

This product has been around for a long time. There are very few barns that you wouldn’t be able to find this product in. Known for its healing capabilities, Micro-Tek Shampoo and Spray go hand in hand. Allow the shampoo to set for roughly 10 minutes, thoroughly dry the legs off, and then apply the spray as a protective barrier.

Shapley’s MTG Plus

Shapley's MTG Plus

Lastly, a cult favorite MTG is now available as MTG Plus. The same formula as the original, but with a new herbal fragrance instead of the dreadful bacon scent of the original. This is a tried and true product that helps soothe the skin, promote hair growth, and provides a barrier as well.

Prevention

Preventing mud fever is your best defense to keep your horse suffering from this skin condition.

  • Rotating paddocks
  • Clean and dry bedding
  • Stalling your horse during treatment to keep it from reoccurring
  • Keep limps dry in inclement weather
  • Keeping areas of the paddock dry where horses stand for long periods (hay feeders, gates)
  • Disinfect equipment
  • Detailed grooming so early signs are caught
  • Avoid over washing or rough grooming
  • Administer an immune support supplement if your horse is in poor condition
  • Spray legs prior to turn out with a medicated spray to provide a barrier on the legs

Fingers crossed we are able to get out of this winter and spring without mud fever dampening our parade! All the aforementioned products are available at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supplies via phone at 800.321.2142 or our website www.bigdweb.com. Feel free to call us to find the best product for you and your horse!

Layer Your Clothing for Changing Weather!

Always Have the Perfect Clothing!

Here in Northeast Ohio our weather can be unpredictable. Some years it seems we have a bitter cold deep freeze in the months of January and February. And other years (much like this year) we have had snow and cold one day and warmth and melting snow the next – which we all know means muddy pastures! This weather makes it hard to know the best clothing to keep you warm in the barn during  winter months. I have a hard time investing in an ultra warm coat and heavy  coveralls when the weather is so unpredictable.

The best answer I have found in a changing climate is layering clothing. The thing I like most about layering up is you can get the most use out of your barn clothing investment by being able to use it in many seasons not just winter. Here at Big Dee’s we have a company filled with animal lovers who are outside taking care of the horses and other pets 365 days a year, so I have been able to get a lot of great advice on everyone’s favorites not just mine.

Base Layer Options

The base layer is always one of the most important parts of staying warm. It’s a light weight way to keep your body heat in and have a soft comfortable fabric against your skin. One of the first things I hear when everyone talks about their favorite base layer would be Back On Track. The reason it’s so popular as a base layer is because it’s a soft thin fabric which makes it easy to wear under other clothing. The material Back on Track is made of is also moisture wicking and the ceramic in the product reflects your own body heat creating warmth (and as a side benefit it helps to reduce pain and inflammation). Back on Track offers T-Shirts, long underwear, leggings, thin gloves (great as glove liners) socks, neck covers, and even boxer shorts –  all make great warm first layer option.

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Clothing
Other options to help keep you warm are to layer with pull on riding tights and sun shirts. Sun Shirts and riding tights are a great way to keep cool in the summer but they also make a great base layer in the winter. One of my favorite sun shirts is by Kastel Denmark. It’s a soft light weight fabric that breathes and gives a great range of options for UPF protection in the summer and warmth in the winter.  Ariat and Arista both make a beautiful Merino Wool quarter zips that will keep you so warm! Kerrits and several other brands make great quarter zips that are lined with fleece for extra warmth.

Utilize Any Season Clothing

So now that you have a lot of base layer options we can move on to what to wear over it. For bottoms it really depends on what you are doing. Are you riding, working in the barn or both? For the top layer, consider the temperature and all of the great outerwear layers that are made for winter. If you are riding English you may want to choose a pair of warm Irideon Windpro three season breeches. You could also try a Soft Shell riding Breech like the new style from Noble Outfitters. If you are doing barn work or riding western you may choose your favorite pair of jeans, chaps or coveralls.

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Ariat | Clothing
Next up is your torso! Soft shell is a term we hear often and it might be one of the best outerwear materials ever invented! You can find soft shell in pullovers as well as zip style jackets. The great thing about soft shell is that the fabric has fleece on the inside. The exterior is smooth, with water and dirt resistance from the elements. It is super warm while being light weight and flexible.  This style jacket paired with a vest makes a great outerwear layer, especially when riding. If you start to get a little warm peel off that vest and keep on going! You can always put it back on when you start to cool down. If you’re not a fan of vests there are great  jacket options that are also light weight and flexible.

Keep Your Feet Warm & Dry

Now that we have covered the core portion of keeping the body warm let’s talk about those parts that get cold first! For me it’s always feet, ears, and hand. I have found the best way to keep your feet warm is to start with a good pair of socks and end with a great pair of boots.  One of my all time favorite socks is made by Noble Outfitters. They are comfortable, well padded and they make great options for winter. You have the option of thermo thin or merino wool.

Noble Outfitters Boots | Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Clothing
Moving on to boots, if you are working in the barn I highly recommend the Noble Outfitters Cold Front Muds Boots – they are warm and comfortable. A great option for people who ride in the winter are Mountain Horse Active Rider Tall Boot. They are warm and have a stirrup friendly sole. If you prefer a paddock boot, I really like the Ariat Extreme H2O Insulated paddock boot. It gives the look of a traditional paddock boot while staying functional for winter.  Another great option that seems to be a little secret in the Standardbred Racing crowd are the Double H Insulated leather boots.

Don’t Forget Head & Hand Protection

A good ear band goes a long way to keep your ears warm in the winter. I have heard many people who wear a helmet say they don’t like an ear bands. While many are made slim and go nicely under helmets, if you are not a fan my answer to you is Sprigs Earbags! The Earbags are two layers of fleece with Thinsulate lining and no band to interfere with your helmet. You just pop them over your ears and go. If you want to listen to your music while working in the barn, try out Sprigs Soundears!

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Gloves | Clothing
Let’s not forget about the endless possibilities for gloves! My all time favorite pair of gloves are the Polartec  Warwick Winter Riding Gloves by Roeckl. They are soft, comfortable and flexible – you will want a pair for the barn and a pair for everyday use! If you have a need for a tougher glove with a rugged exterior try the SSG Ten Below. Many enthusiasts at Big Dee’s use and recommend this glove. The SSG Ten Below is really warm due to the Thinsulate lining. It also has a great grippy palm, but the most impressive feature is that it’s waterproof. I don’t mean if you are in a rainstorm your hands won’t get wet waterproof, I mean you can submerge your hand in a water bucket to right below the cuff and not feel a drip of water!

Finally if you love to use those handy hand and toe warmers for a little boost of warmth, the Heritage Extreme Winter Gloves are for you. There is a pocket on the top of the glove where you can place the hand warmer and zip it up. This positioning keeps it comfortable and on top of the artery that brings warm blood flow to your hands.

Hopefully these tips and insights into winter clothing can help you choose the best products for you!

The Scoop on Custom Tall Riding Boots

The Scoop on Custom Tall Riding Boots – Fitting and Selection

With Big Dee’s Custom Boot Event kicking into full swing this week, I thought it would be a great time to give your the scoop on custom tall riding boots and my recent ordering experience!

Why are Tall Boots Important?

Custom Tall Riding Boots to complete the tweed ensemble
The perfect outfit I have been dreaming of includes a classic tweed jacket, beautiful brown tall boots and a smart brown helmet.

Regardless of your riding interests and style, everyone has that perfect picture in their mind of how we would love to look and feel in the saddle. I envision myself in a classic ensemble that includes a tweed hacking jacket, rich brown boots and a smart brown helmet. Beyond the obvious fashion aspect there is more to a good quality boot. For me, my boots and helmet are the only two things that I really must have in order to feel safe and confident while riding a horse. Tall boots are a key transmitter in the language between you and your horse through your leg aids. Undoubtedly the comfort and fit of your tall riding boots can make or break your ride all together. Whether they are too tall, too tight, too small in the foot, too sloppy in the leg, or perhaps just too old, battered and broken; we’ve all been there, that moment when you decide enough is enough and you’ve got to find something better.

Why choose custom?

Last spring my schooling boots failed beyond repair, and I started wearing my Tredstep Field Boots. They are beautiful, fit me like a glove and had previously been reserved for use only while showing and foxhunting. In an effort to ensure their continuing good looks I knew I should get another pair of tall boots to take up the brunt of my daily wear.  Despite being able to shop through an extensive offering of top name brand tall boots in both brown and black, finding an off-the shelf Continue reading The Scoop on Custom Tall Riding Boots

Complete selection of equine and rider products since 1976!