All posts by Cassie Hupric

Fly Season is Upon Us!

This week Tish and I did a Facebook Live event discussing our picks for the upcoming Fly Season. You can view the video here and read further about a few of the products highlighted in this video:

The new fly sheet scrim made it’s debut this week! This is a great option for those at the track, tying horses out on the trailer, or hanging out ringside at a horse show. This scrim is lightweight and breathable while keeping the flies off from your horse! Available in three colors, with choices of red, blue, and green. This scrim is not ideal for turn out as it does not have any additional fasteners under the belly or around the hind legs, allowing this sheet to easily become misaligned on your horse’s body.

Next we moved along to the mesh fly sheet with belly surcingle straps. This fly sheet is ideal for turning out in, as it is able to be secured with leg straps and belly straps. New for this year is the attached next cover! This provides great coverage to keep those flies off and help protect against being sunbleached!

Another great option for keeping flies off is our protective fly sheet. This one is ideal for those horses that like to be rough on their clothing or have other horses that tug and pull on them. They are a bit stiffer, but they do provide more durability.

After going over these great options for fly protection we touched on some of our favorite fly masks. These included the Crusader, Absorine Supermask, UltraShield Fly Mask, Noble Outfitters Guardsman, and our cult favorite our lycra with mesh fly mask.  There are so many options that it would be impossible for you to not find one that suits your horse’s needs!

We soon moved onto our favorite topical options, including some of the best all natural fly repellents. Pyranha and Aborbine definitely make effective fly sprays that I would highly recommend. The Pyranha aerosol is my personal favorite followed by the UltraShield Ex, as they have the highest levels of pyrethrins which is what kills the fly as it bites your horse. For a more natural approach Fly Bye is our #1 go-to and we have a new product EcoVet which seems to make an impression on Tish if you watch the video!

Of course we touched on some other fly protection items like the rump and belly guard, attachable neck guard, and the big seller leg fly wraps. You can see all of those here. If you have any questions about a particular product shoot us a text at 800.321.2142 or send us a message! We can certainly find something to fit your needs!

Click here to shop Fly Control

Electrolyte Supplementation

Summer Electrolyte Guide

As the summer months arrive, most of us are much more active with our horses which means time for an electrolyte.  Whether we are participating in shows, contesting, pleasure classes, jumping, dressage, or out on the trail, we need to pay extra attention to hydration levels in our horses during these next several months.

Horses sweat profusely.  They sweat more than people, about 3 times more, and lose more electrolytes through their sweat than we do.  In fact, horses dissipate about 85% of excess heat through sweating, and the remainder through respiration (Read More).   Additionally, horse sweat is saltier than human sweat; it contains high levels of sodium, potassium, chloride, magnesium, and calcium.  These macromineral electrolytes are essential for conducting electricity, and keeping muscles firing correctly.  Skeletal muscles, muscles in the digestive tract, and heart muscles are all negatively impacted by electrolyte imbalance. As is proper absorption of feed nutrients.

Big Dee's | Electrolytes | Supplements

Effects of Imbalances

Conditions such as Thumps and Tying-up can both be linked to dehydration and electrolyte imbalances.  If you plan on trail riding, eventing, showing, fox hunting, certainly racing, or even trailering your horse this summer, consider using electrolytes to restore that balance and improve recovery times for your horse.

There are many commercial electrolytes available these days.  Some of them contain high levels of sugars, while others do not.  I tend to look for those that are higher in chloride and low in sugar.  Dr. Clair Thunes of Summit Equine Nutrition recommends looking for one with a sodium : potassium : chloride ratio that is similar to that found in sweat, 2:1:3.8 (Read More).  Perfect Balance by Peak Performance is one such electrolyte.

Big Dee's | Electrolytes | Supplements

How to Feed Electrolytes

One of the best ways to feed electrolytes is to mix them in with your horse’s water.  Be sure to read the feeding guidelines on your electrolyte container, as the ratio may vary depending on how heavily your horse has worked.  When offering electrolytes in water, ALWAYS be sure to offer plain water as well.  Sometimes horses will not drink the electrolyte water, and if that is all that is available, their electrolyte imbalance and dehydration will only worsen.

Another method is to top dress the electrolyte on their feed.  I have found this method to be more palatable for one of my horses, however, be sure to monitor water consumption when feeding the electrolyte.  If your horse is not drinking after ingesting electrolytes top dressed on its feed, it may urinate more frequently to restore sodium balance, resulting in increased dehydration.

Whatever activities you have planned for your horse this summer, don’t forget to include electrolytes as a staple of your horse’s recovery.  They can be used before and after work to ensure that your horse remains healthy and happy.

 

Click here to shop all Electrolytes

Formula 707 Simplifies their Product Line!

We are really excited here at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supply that Formula 707 has made a huge effort to make their product easier to administer to horses! I am sure barn owners and boarders alike can attest to the challenges of setting up their supplement routine for their horses. Formula 707 has introduced Fresh Packs! Their supplements are now available in pre-packaged servings to make traveling to events easier and making sure that feeding routines are simplified. What else makes these Fresh Packs great, you ask? Well, for one- these fresh packs insure just that, your supplement stays fresh! We all know how it is when you get half-way through a supplement and it’s hardened or changed consistency. It’s money right out the window. Another great aspect of this product is you know that you are giving the right amount needed for your horse, and they are extremely convenient to use. Also, they are affordable!

For me, I find the Fresh Packs extremely desirable.  First reason being, I know that my horse is getting the correct serving based on these pre-measured packets. Secondly, I know that when I head to shows, I don’t have have to find containers to ration the servings out or drag the whole tub with me. I can also imagine for those that are responsible for feeding horses at a large barn will enjoy the amount time that is reduced by using these new Fresh Packs!

Lets get into the actual products by Formula 707 that are available at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supply! Continue reading Formula 707 Simplifies their Product Line!

Bitless Training with Justin Dunn!

We had an amazing opportunity to team up with Weaver Leather and Justin Dunn with Justin Dun Mustang Horsemanship to host a few seminars at our 3rd Annual Anniversary Event at our store located in Streetsboro, Ohio. We were really excited to have Justin Dunn join us to talk to us about his Bitless Bridle that he partnered with  Weaver Leather to make. Justin Dunn gained his notoriety through the Extreme Mustang Makeover.

We got to know Justin a little bit more and how he got his start with Bitless training and mustangs. We also had the opportunity to host a contest for a local Big Dee’s fan to win a private one hour session with Justin Dunn!

The winner of the contest was Sarah and her recently rescued mustang mare Mae, whom she was fostering. Sarah had been experiencing difficulty gaining Mae’s trust and this couldn’t be more up Justin’s alley! Here are some pictures from when we first arrived to meet Sarah and Mae: Continue reading Bitless Training with Justin Dunn!

Practical Bitting Seminar

Practical Bitting Seminar

horse bits

Wondering about your choice of bits for your horse or is bitting a mystery to you?

Does your horse have telltale signs it might be the wrong choice?

Do you know how to determine the correct bit size for your horse?

Have you run out of friend’s bits to try?

We can help with all of this & more!

Join bitting experts Vivian Schmidt & Lisa Gorretta at our Herm Sprenger practical bitting seminar on Sunday April 23rd at Sweetwater Equestrian Center – 6490 Peck Rd. Ravenna, OH 44266. This seminar is FREE! Schedule a time to bring your horse to discuss issues & find the correct fit!

Time slots for horses available from 10:00 am – 2:00 pm.

Space is limited – call to reserve your spot today! 1-800-321-2142

No horse is necessary to attend the seminar – attendees are welcomed & encouraged!

You can also attend Vivian’s seminar during the Anniversary Sale Event at Big Dee’s on Saturday April 22nd at 1:00 pm!


Practical Bitting Seminar

Safe Spring Pasture Practices

Introducing a Horse to Spring Pasture

Eventually Spring will come.  Despite the massive snowfall much of Northeast Ohio received this past week, Spring is on its way.  Many of us have cloistered our horses in their stalls for much of the winter.  When turned out in the pasture, they have been dependent on round bales. Some sifted through the snow for any scraps of dormant grass they could find.  All of them have been dependent upon hay for their forage needs, but soon we will have lush green pastures once again.  While this is a fantastic occurrence, early spring grass presents its own challenges for us horse owners.

First, to preserve the integrity of our pastures, we need to let our grass grow and develop healthy root systems.  To ensure healthy pastures that will last all summer and into the fall, it may be necessary to use a sacrifice area or paddock for a few weeks.  According to an article found on the Penn State University Extension website – grass should be allowed to grow to 4-6 inches before introducing horses to pasture. Continue reading Safe Spring Pasture Practices

Multi-Vitamins for Horses

Multi-Vitamin Supplements

Deciding on an adequate nutrition program for one’s horse can, at times, be a frustrating endeavor.  There are so many differences, from types of feed to the amount one needs to feed to ensure all of your horse’s nutritional needs are being met.  Combine that with differences in the quality of hay from field to field.  First to second cut, and nutrient loss over time – one can really struggle to provide the best possible diet for one’s horse.  Feeding a general multi-vitamin can help ensure that your horse is getting the vitamins and minerals it needs.

Multi-vitamins are going to include a wide range of vitamins including vitamin A, D, E, and the B-complex vitamins.  Most horses can meet their requirements of vitamin A simply by grazing.  However, especially here in northeast Ohio, horses are unable to graze year round.  As we switch from relying on pasture for our horses forage requirements to relying on hay, we need to consider the impact storage has on vitamin content.

What Should You Look For

Hay, no matter what quality, will lose vitamins, especially vitamin A over time.  The hay we are feeding in February, March, and April is of significantly lower quality than the same hay that was fed last September or October. Because vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin, horses are capable of storing it for a certain amount of time. This can somewhat offset the content lost in hay over time. However, towards the end of winter it may be a good idea to look for alternative sources for vitamin A.

Vitamin D is readily available, especially during summer months, as horses can obtain all they need from the sun.  Again though, not all of our horses are turned out all day during the winter months.  Some show horses are kept stalled and turned out either for short amounts of time, or in indoor arenas only.  For these horses, vitamin D supplementation is important as well.

Horses in strenuous work during the winter months have and horses suffering from muscular system disorders need extra help.  Supplemental vitamin E and the mineral selenium can be very valuable and help prevent certain disorders. Continue reading Multi-Vitamins for Horses

Mud Fever getting you down?


We’ve all been there when our seemingly healthy horse comes in from the pasture or out of their stall one morning with blown up legs. You immediately take a gander and feel around with your hands searching for heat or a cut, only to find a colony of scabs. The entire leg may or may not look like a balloon, but your heart feels like it’s about to burst. Though this is a common nuisance for horse owners, mud fever can be a pain to deal with and can lead to chronic skin issues.

So what is mud fever? Mud fever is a common name for pastern dermatitis. It is an infection caused by a group of bacteria that flourish in wet and muddy conditions. Mud fever is a loose term for a whole slew of skin reactions affecting the lower extremities of your horse. Mud fever can also be referred to as “greasy heels” or “cracked heels”, as the heels are usually the origin of the infection.

The mud fever causing bacterial organisms do just fine living on healthy equine skin causing little to no harm on its own. However, once a cut, scrape, or wound is present, the door has been opened for the bacterial organisms to climb their way into the layers of the skin. Once the skin has been injured or breeched by being too wet, a bite, or injury, the bacteria then multiple in the damp and warm skin causing an infection.

Images of Mud Fever on the heels

Symptoms of Mud Fever in Horses Mud Fever also know as pastern dermatitis Irritation caused by Equine Mud Fever Mud Fever can spread quickly on the horses pastern and lower limbs

Mud fever can quickly spread to other areas of the lower leg and become a more severe infection.

Causes

There are conditions that predispose horses to mud fever. Even certain soil types can make horses prone to mud fever. Some of other contributing factors are:

  • White limbs or white patches (may be due to photosensitivity)
  • Prolonged exposure to damp & muddy paddocks
  • Soiled bedding
  • Sweat that has not been properly removed
  • Not thoroughly drying the limbs when excessive washing is a constant occurance
  • Feathered legs- mostly because they tend to be washed more than those without feathers
  • Injury resulting from rubs, bites, chaffing, excessive and rough grooming
  • Weak immune system compromising the integrity of the skin which is more than likely secondary to another underlying condition
  • Mites
  • Fungal infections

Signs

There are many tell tale signs of mud fever as well, as it can come in many forms:

  • Scabs beneath matted areas of hair
  • Once the hair and scab falls off, there are circular ulcerated lesions of moist and red skin
  • Discharges in a thick, creamy consistency, are usually white, yellow, or green color and found between the skin and scab
  • The scab will have a concave shape, with hair follicles protruding. Mud fever and rain rot/scald are the same thing just on different parts of the body.
  • Hair loss
  • Severe causes have been known to show the skin splitting in the back, thus the term cracked heels
  • Heat and swelling are typically present and can generate up to the knee or hock
  • In the most severe cases, lameness, loss of appetite, and depression are present

Treatment

The best preventative for mud fever is to keep the legs as dry as possible for as long as possible when there are wet and muddy conditions. Once mud fever has set in there are a few topical treatments that can be applied to help heal your horses skin. Take a look below for a few of our favorites:

Keratex Mud Shield Powder

Keratex Mud Shield Powder

This product helps guard against mud and water while disinfecting the skin. What is great about this product and makes it standout is that it is a powder. So rather than continually keeping the skin damp with promotes bacterial growth, this is a dry application that can be used as after it the legs have been shampooed and dried, or as a preventative on the way out to pasture.

Absorbine Fungasol

Absorbine Fungasol

This is a great product line that includes a shampoo, spray, and ointment. Gently scrub the entire leg with the Fungasol shampoo and let it sit for about 7-10 minutes, so that it can kill all the bad bacteria. Then thoroughly dry the legs off, top with the Fungasol spray and apply the ointment where there are deep fissures.

Muck Itch Spray

Muck Itch Spray for Horses

This is a relatively newer product on the market and the feedback has been great! It specifically treats mud fever and provides a protective barrier to the skin. What is really cool with this product is the use of organic essential oils.  This helps calm the skin and allow new hair growth to begin.

Micro-Tek Medicated Shampoo and Spray

Micro Tek Equine Spray - Soothes on Contact Micro Tek Equine Shampoo - Soothes on Contact

This product has been around for a long time. There are very few barns that you wouldn’t be able to find this product in. Known for its healing capabilities, Micro-Tek Shampoo and Spray go hand in hand. Allow the shampoo to set for roughly 10 minutes, thoroughly dry the legs off, and then apply the spray as a protective barrier.

Shapley’s MTG Plus

Shapley's MTG Plus

Lastly, a cult favorite MTG is now available as MTG Plus. The same formula as the original, but with a new herbal fragrance instead of the dreadful bacon scent of the original. This is a tried and true product that helps soothe the skin, promote hair growth, and provides a barrier as well.

Prevention

Preventing mud fever is your best defense to keep your horse suffering from this skin condition.

  • Rotating paddocks
  • Clean and dry bedding
  • Stalling your horse during treatment to keep it from reoccurring
  • Keep limps dry in inclement weather
  • Keeping areas of the paddock dry where horses stand for long periods (hay feeders, gates)
  • Disinfect equipment
  • Detailed grooming so early signs are caught
  • Avoid over washing or rough grooming
  • Administer an immune support supplement if your horse is in poor condition
  • Spray legs prior to turn out with a medicated spray to provide a barrier on the legs

Fingers crossed we are able to get out of this winter and spring without mud fever dampening our parade! All the aforementioned products are available at Big Dee’s Tack and Vet Supplies via phone at 800.321.2142 or our website www.bigdweb.com. Feel free to call us to find the best product for you and your horse!

Layer Your Clothing for Changing Weather!

Always Have the Perfect Clothing!

Here in Northeast Ohio our weather can be unpredictable. Some years it seems we have a bitter cold deep freeze in the months of January and February. And other years (much like this year) we have had snow and cold one day and warmth and melting snow the next – which we all know means muddy pastures! This weather makes it hard to know the best clothing to keep you warm in the barn during  winter months. I have a hard time investing in an ultra warm coat and heavy  coveralls when the weather is so unpredictable.

The best answer I have found in a changing climate is layering clothing. The thing I like most about layering up is you can get the most use out of your barn clothing investment by being able to use it in many seasons not just winter. Here at Big Dee’s we have a company filled with animal lovers who are outside taking care of the horses and other pets 365 days a year, so I have been able to get a lot of great advice on everyone’s favorites not just mine.

Base Layer Options

The base layer is always one of the most important parts of staying warm. It’s a light weight way to keep your body heat in and have a soft comfortable fabric against your skin. One of the first things I hear when everyone talks about their favorite base layer would be Back On Track. The reason it’s so popular as a base layer is because it’s a soft thin fabric which makes it easy to wear under other clothing. The material Back on Track is made of is also moisture wicking and the ceramic in the product reflects your own body heat creating warmth (and as a side benefit it helps to reduce pain and inflammation). Back on Track offers T-Shirts, long underwear, leggings, thin gloves (great as glove liners) socks, neck covers, and even boxer shorts –  all make great warm first layer option.

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Clothing
Other options to help keep you warm are to layer with pull on riding tights and sun shirts. Sun Shirts and riding tights are a great way to keep cool in the summer but they also make a great base layer in the winter. One of my favorite sun shirts is by Kastel Denmark. It’s a soft light weight fabric that breathes and gives a great range of options for UPF protection in the summer and warmth in the winter.  Ariat and Arista both make a beautiful Merino Wool quarter zips that will keep you so warm! Kerrits and several other brands make great quarter zips that are lined with fleece for extra warmth.

Utilize Any Season Clothing

So now that you have a lot of base layer options we can move on to what to wear over it. For bottoms it really depends on what you are doing. Are you riding, working in the barn or both? For the top layer, consider the temperature and all of the great outerwear layers that are made for winter. If you are riding English you may want to choose a pair of warm Irideon Windpro three season breeches. You could also try a Soft Shell riding Breech like the new style from Noble Outfitters. If you are doing barn work or riding western you may choose your favorite pair of jeans, chaps or coveralls.

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Ariat | Clothing
Next up is your torso! Soft shell is a term we hear often and it might be one of the best outerwear materials ever invented! You can find soft shell in pullovers as well as zip style jackets. The great thing about soft shell is that the fabric has fleece on the inside. The exterior is smooth, with water and dirt resistance from the elements. It is super warm while being light weight and flexible.  This style jacket paired with a vest makes a great outerwear layer, especially when riding. If you start to get a little warm peel off that vest and keep on going! You can always put it back on when you start to cool down. If you’re not a fan of vests there are great  jacket options that are also light weight and flexible.

Keep Your Feet Warm & Dry

Now that we have covered the core portion of keeping the body warm let’s talk about those parts that get cold first! For me it’s always feet, ears, and hand. I have found the best way to keep your feet warm is to start with a good pair of socks and end with a great pair of boots.  One of my all time favorite socks is made by Noble Outfitters. They are comfortable, well padded and they make great options for winter. You have the option of thermo thin or merino wool.

Noble Outfitters Boots | Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Clothing
Moving on to boots, if you are working in the barn I highly recommend the Noble Outfitters Cold Front Muds Boots – they are warm and comfortable. A great option for people who ride in the winter are Mountain Horse Active Rider Tall Boot. They are warm and have a stirrup friendly sole. If you prefer a paddock boot, I really like the Ariat Extreme H2O Insulated paddock boot. It gives the look of a traditional paddock boot while staying functional for winter.  Another great option that seems to be a little secret in the Standardbred Racing crowd are the Double H Insulated leather boots.

Don’t Forget Head & Hand Protection

A good ear band goes a long way to keep your ears warm in the winter. I have heard many people who wear a helmet say they don’t like an ear bands. While many are made slim and go nicely under helmets, if you are not a fan my answer to you is Sprigs Earbags! The Earbags are two layers of fleece with Thinsulate lining and no band to interfere with your helmet. You just pop them over your ears and go. If you want to listen to your music while working in the barn, try out Sprigs Soundears!

Big Dee's Tack & Vet Supplies | Gloves | Clothing
Let’s not forget about the endless possibilities for gloves! My all time favorite pair of gloves are the Polartec  Warwick Winter Riding Gloves by Roeckl. They are soft, comfortable and flexible – you will want a pair for the barn and a pair for everyday use! If you have a need for a tougher glove with a rugged exterior try the SSG Ten Below. Many enthusiasts at Big Dee’s use and recommend this glove. The SSG Ten Below is really warm due to the Thinsulate lining. It also has a great grippy palm, but the most impressive feature is that it’s waterproof. I don’t mean if you are in a rainstorm your hands won’t get wet waterproof, I mean you can submerge your hand in a water bucket to right below the cuff and not feel a drip of water!

Finally if you love to use those handy hand and toe warmers for a little boost of warmth, the Heritage Extreme Winter Gloves are for you. There is a pocket on the top of the glove where you can place the hand warmer and zip it up. This positioning keeps it comfortable and on top of the artery that brings warm blood flow to your hands.

Hopefully these tips and insights into winter clothing can help you choose the best products for you!

Weight Builders for Horses

How Can You Keep Weight on Your Horse in Winter Months?

While this winter has so far been quite mild here in Northeast Ohio, it is usually very common for some horses to drop weight during the winter months.  Freezing temperatures can place quite a demand on the horse to burn calories simply to stay warm.  Horses also lack the benefit of lush pastures, and have to obtain a majority of their calories through hay intake.  One of the best ways to keep weight on a horse during the winter months is to increase hay intake.  However, not all of us have a barn full of hay that will allow us to do this.  If you have ever tried to purchase additional hay in January and February, you may have noticed it is a bit more expensive than in June and July.  Additionally, boarding facilities typically run on a tight budget, and may not be able to increase hay rations to the levels needed to maintain horses in optimal condition.  So, what can you do to supply your horse with the calories needed to stay warm and fit?

I recommend looking at a fat supplement to supply the extra calories.  Increasing the fat content of your horse’s diet can be beneficial not only for weight gain, but for skin and coat health, and a host of other reasons as well.  For weight gain, fat contains a substantial amount of energy or calories.  In fact, it contains more than twice the calorie content of carbohydrates or proteins!  When looking to add weight to a horse, look no further than fat sources.  Horses can absorb about 20% of their diet as fat, but most experts will recommend roughly 10-12% of the total diet be constituted from fat sources.

Horse Supplements
There are many ways to add fat to a horse’s diet, including top dressing with a vegetable or corn oil, using a fat supplement such as Gain Weight, Weight Builder, or Ultimate Finish 40 or 100. You can also use a fortified, extruded fat supplement such as Progressive Nutrition’s Envision, Buckeye Nutrition’s Ultimate Finish 25, Tribute’s K Finish, or Purina’s Amplify. You can opt for a stabilized rice bran supplement such as Equi-Jewel by Kentucky Performance Products.  Supplementing the diet with a cup of corn oil may be the most economical, but there are other factors to consider, especially omega fatty acid levels.

You hear quite a bit about omega fatty acid content in horse supplements, specifically, omega 3’s, omega 6’s.  There are huge differences between how these fatty acids interact with a horse’s body.  In order to give your horse the greatest benefit from a fat source, you must consider those effects when deciding which fat source is the best fit.

Omega 3 fatty acids are anti-inflammatory in nature.  They help balance the immune system, protect joints and ligaments, reduce skin allergies, improve heart and vascular health, and have many other beneficial properties.  Omega 6 fatty acids are pro-inflammatory and tend to aid in blood clotting.  It is important to note, both Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids are considered essential fatty acids, meaning horses cannot produce them on their own.  They must come from external sources, and horses need both of them.  The important component to consider is the ratio of omega 3’s to omega 6’s.

Vegetable oils, especially corn oil, tend to be high in omega 6, and low in omega 3 content.  Adding corn oil will add calories to your horse’s diet and improve coat luster, but certainly will not benefit an older horse with creaky joints or a horse subject to seasonal skin allergies. To start, I look for a product that is higher in omega 3 content than omega 6, so that I can be sure my horses are getting the added benefits omega 3’s provide.

Horse Care | Supplements
If you are feeding fat simply for the weight gain factor, I would recommend choosing a product such as Buckeye Nutrition’s Ultimate Finish 100 or Cool Calories 100.  Both of these are 99% fat and are designed simply to add weight.  They are not as engineered for Omega 3 and 6 ratios, but are excellent for bulking up that thin horse.  Another option would be to go with an oil like Coca Soya, Rice Bran oil, or FSO (which is a flax seed and soy oil mix), or Equine Omega’s Mega Gain.  Typically oils are in the 98-99% fat range and are great at adding weight.  However, palatability can be an issue with an oil, especially if fed in large amounts.

If you are looking for a product that will help with weight gain, but has been designed with Omega 3 and 6 ratios in mind, take a look at Buckeye Nutrition’s Ultimate Finish 40, Gain Weight, or Weight Builder.  All of these products are roughly 40% fat, with 14% protein.  They do a good job of putting weight on while providing the benefits of a higher Omega 3 to 6 ratio.  Currently, I have one horse on a fat supplement, more for the anti-inflammatory and coat benefit than for a weight gain.  I am using Equine Omega Complete, which is one of the best on the market.

Hopefully, this has given you some good options to consider when choosing a fat supplement.  Remember, to introduce fat slowly to the horse’s diet, and consult with your veterinarian if your horse has a history of liver issues before deciding on a fat supplement.